Forum Posts

Bryant
Jan 26, 2022
In Student and Alumni Events
ago 3 min read Virtual Recent Graduate Career Retreat Wednesday, February 2, 2022 | 1 pm to 3 pm This two-hour retreat is meant for recent graduates who are transitioning to the world of work. Alumni who attend this retreat will be provided with the foundational tools needed to create a job search action plan for their first job after graduation. Alumni will learn how VIPS (values, interests, personality, and skills) relate to opportunities for career growth. Further, we will explore how to properly research careers and companies, develop a target company list and a more systematic approach to the job search process. The workshop will be interactive and provide alumni with the needed foundation to gain clarity and the tools to begin career exploration and land a job. Registration is required through Zoom » This program is an Alumni Career Services offering brought to the by the Alumni Association and the Career Center. BLA x Ballet: A Unity and Cultural Experience Saturday, February 5, 2022 Come celebrate Black History Month and connect with fellow alums over appetizers and refreshments before enjoying the Complexions Contemporary Ballet at the Staller Center. 6 pm to 7:30 pm Reception Wang Center Lobby 8pm Complexions Contemporary Ballet Staller Center, Main Stage Register here » Tickets are $75 per person and include appetizers and refreshments. Your support will benefit student scholarships. Proof of vaccination and masks are required to attend this event. Renaissance School of Medicine 50th Anniversary Panel Presentation: Medical Education from Overhead Projectors to Zoom Thursday, February 10, 2022 | 6 pm As Renaissance School of Medicine turns 50, we’re planning exciting events for alumni and friends. The first, scheduled for February, will feature an esteemed panel of alumni sharing memories and discussing their medical education and how it has evolved over the years—from the 1970s to the present. Following the panel, breakout sessions will be hosted for alumni, where you can do some of your own reminiscing. CME credits available. Please join us for Stony Brook Medical Education: From Overhead Projectors to Zoom. Register here » Moderator: Kaitlin Monroig – MS4 Faculty Panelists Representing Each Half-Decade of Graduates: 1974-1979 – Lucy Palmer, MD ’79 (Medicine) 1980-1984 – Sharon Nachman, MD ‘83 (Pediatrics) 1985-1989 – Marsha Tanenberg-Karant, MD ‘89 (Psychiatry) 1990-1994 – Todd Griffin, MD ‘93 (Ob/Gyn) 1995-1999 – Cara Harth, MD ’98 (Neurology) 2000-2004 – Jason Kim, MD ‘03 (Urology) 2005-2009 – Angela Kokkosis, MD ’05 (Surgery) 2010-2014 – Patricia Ng, MD ‘12 (Medicine) 2015-2019 – Marshall Leonard, MD ’16 (Emergency Medicine) 2020-2024 – Justice Achonu, MD ’20 (Resident in Orthopaedics) Stony Brook University Alumni and Friends Networking Event at the ACS Conference in San Diego Monday, March 21, 2022 | 5 pm to 6 pm Reconnect with your fellow alumni and faculty from the Department of Chemistry during the American Chemical Society’s Annual Conference. Register here » Spring Virtual Job and Internship Fairs The Career Center invites job seekers and employers to join us at for an upcoming virtual job and internship fair this spring: IT and Engineering Job & Internship Fair Friday, February 11, 2022 1 pm to 5 pm Registration Deadline: February 4, 2022 Alumni Job Seekers » Alumni Employers » Business, Communications and Journalism Job & Internship Fair Friday, February 18, 2022 1 pm to 4 pm Registration Deadline: February 11, 2022 Alumni Job Seekers » Alumni Employers » Healthcare, Research and Human Services Job & Internship Fair Friday, March 4, 2022 1 pm to 4 pm Registration Deadline: February 25, 2022 Alumni Job Seekers » Alumni Employers » Questions? Contact Kimberly Dixon, Director of Employer Engagement and Diversity at kimberly.dixon@stonybrook.edu.
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Bryant
Sep 23, 2021
In Student and Alumni Events
Let's Celebrate This Year's Outstanding AlumniJoin us as we celebrate our 25th anniversary of our outstanding alumni and hear from them about their career paths. Breakout sessions will follow. Thursday, October 21, 2021 4 pm EDT Registration is required through Zoom » Please register by Monday, October 18, 2021. Meet our outstanding and distinguished alumni who have demonstrated their desire to make a difference in their professional field. Aimee Brunelle '95 Athletic TrainingKristen Connolly '14 Physical TherapySongkai Hu '13 Clinical Laboratory SciencesEmanuel Mkrtichian '75 Physician Assistant Melissa Molina-Trinidad '09 Health SciencesLauren Maloney '09 ParamedicMarlyn Wu '07 Respiratory Care Give Today | Privacy Policy | Email Preferences | Unsubscribe Stony Brook Alumni Association, Stony Brook University, E-1315 Frank Melville Jr. Memorial Library, Stony Brook, NY, 11794-3354 Stony Brook Foundation, Stony Brook University, 230 Administration, Stony Brook, NY 11794-1188
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Bryant
Aug 10, 2021
In FYI Links
https://nl.nytimes.com/f/newsletter/fFYmRtGaeT7BBXtL4xvpFA~~/AAAAAQA~/RgRi9Le4P0TeaHR0cHM6Ly93d3cubnl0aW1lcy5jb20vMjAyMS8wOC8wOS9vcGluaW9uL2FnaW5nLW51cnNpbmctaG9tZS1tZWRpY2FyZS5odG1sP2NhbXBhaWduX2lkPTImZW1jPWVkaXRfdGhfMjAyMTA4MTAmaW5zdGFuY2VfaWQ9Mzc1Mzcmbmw9dG9kYXlzaGVhZGxpbmVzJnJlZ2lfaWQ9NjYwMzc1MTQmc2VnbWVudF9pZD02NTgyNyZ1c2VyX2lkPTBiNjNlNjU1MjRiODExYzljNDYzZDM4MzkzMTYxZDM4VwNueXRCCmERuDISYVpVWepSEmthZGVuZ2UxQGdtYWlsLmNvbVgEAAAAAA~~
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Bryant
Aug 04, 2021
In FYI Links
VACCINE PROJECT NEWSLETTER Getty Images By Jeff Forster This week’s Vaccine Project Newsletter is 2,862 words and will take you eight minutes to read. Delta has effectively flipped a switch and flipped the script on pandemic life in America, though we’re not exactly right back where we started from. A year ago at this time, we had millions of willing arms and, alas, no vaccines. Today, eight months into a vaccination campaign, with half the country vaccinated and half not, we have an ample supply of vaccines in search of willing arms. Any way you look at it, the aggressive spread of the SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant both here and abroad is a game-changer, a tipping point or whatever catchphrase captures a reality we had hoped was long gone. Delta is not the only culprit, however. Its accomplices include suboptimal vaccination coverage and summertime loosening of social restrictions coast to coast and across the pond. The moment arrived without great fanfare, but we did reach our goal of getting at least one COVID-19 shot into the arms of 70% of adults. It didn’t happen on the original "due date" of July 4, but a month later. Despite that collective achievement, only 20 of 50 states reached the 70% mark. Delta, now accounting for more than 80% of new infections, has taken advantage of opportunities to surge over the past few months. The seven-day moving average of new COVID-19 cases was 72,790 last Friday, higher than the average of 68,700 last summer when no vaccine was available. For perspective, the low was 11,000 in June of this year and the high more than 250,000 in January. Florida recently logged its highest one-day total of the entire pandemic period, with more than 21,000 cases. The sunshine state is also dealing with the shade cast by a new variant first detected in Colombia that doesn’t even have a Greek letter yet. The demographics of disease are changing in a scenario some have described as "younger, sicker, quicker." The typical patient hospitalized with COVID-19 in Massachusetts, the Boston Globe reports, is no longer a 70-year-old with multiple health conditions but someone in their 40s or 50s, previously healthy, often a person of color—and unvaccinated. Emergency rooms in Alaska are seeing and admitting more COVID-19 patients in their 30s, 40s and 50s, notes the Anchorage Daily News. In Montana, the Billings Clinic is caring for 18 COVID-19 patients, with four patients on ventilators, two of them in their 30s, the Billings Gazette reports. The vast majority of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across the country are unvaccinated. Sponsored Content COVID-19 has made a big impact in the world this past year and greatly burdened the healthcare system. Healthcare providers followed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s three W’s to continue to reduce the spread: Wear a mask, Wash your hands and Watch your distance. As wound incidence increased during the pandemic, there is another “W” that deserves our attention: Wound management. With the continued goal of eliminating unnecessary exposure for both vulnerable residents and high-risk healthcare workers, wound management demands products that represent best practice.   Post-July 4 fireworks We are now witnessing the ripple effect of several Delta-driven announcements within the past week. One came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, advising that all persons, regardless of vaccination status, wear masks indoors in public places in areas with substantial or high transmission of disease. That description now applies to 80% of counties in the U.S. The policy reverses the "no masks for the vaccinated" pronouncement delivered in mid-May, when Delta represented just 1% of new infections. CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said, "I have no interest in continuing mask guidance, and the best way to stop a new variant from spreading is to have less virus out there and the best way to do that is to get people vaccinated and to mask up until they are." Influential in the CDC decision was an outbreak on Cape Cod, following "multiple summer events and large public gatherings" from July 3 to 17 where future COVID-19 patients attended "densely packed indoor and outdoor events at venues that included bars, restaurants, guest houses and rental homes." The "tourism-focused community" was not mentioned in the CDC report, but was identified in other reports as Provincetown. Of 469 COVID-19 cases among Massachusetts residents, 74% were fully vaccinated people. Of those, 87% were male with a median age of 42. Most of the breakthrough infections in Provincetown (79%) were symptomatic (cough, headache, sore throat, fever, muscle pain). Four patients needed hospital care. Genomic sequencing of specimens from 133 of the 469 cases turned up Delta in 89%. Infection produced similar viral loads in the vaccinated and unvaccinated. "This finding is concerning and was a pivotal discovery leading to CDC's updated mask recommendation," Walensky said. The purpose of the update on masking, she added, is "to ensure the vaccinated public would not unknowingly transmit virus to others, including their unvaccinated or immunocompromised loved ones." The revised guidelines advise wearing masks not just in public indoor places in COVID hot spots but also in households with people who are vulnerable to the disease because they are older, have underlying medical conditions or a weakened immune system. Or are unvaccinated. In response to CDC’s latest pronouncements, mandates or "strong recommendations" for indoor masking are back in place in many areas across the country, from Disneyland to the San Francisco Bay Area and from the campus of Ohio State University to the museums of the Smithsonian Institution. Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards has temporarily reinstated a mask mandate for everyone age 5 and older, noting that the state has the nation’s highest rate of new cases per capita and is experiencing "the worst surge of the COVID-19 pandemic so far in terms of case growth rate, percent positivity and hospitalizations," Edwards said. "I am pleading with unvaccinated Louisianans to get their shot as soon as they can to protect themselves. We can end this nightmare, but it is going to take all of us working together to do it." The CDC, while emphasizing that COVID-19 mitigation policies are developed locally, offers guidance to decision makers that takes into account community transmission rates, vaccination coverage, health system capacity and populations at risk. Sponsored Content Join us to see how Eclipse Senior Living has focused on workforce strategies and reinforced the need to drive a culture of empathy, flexibility, inclusion and recognition for future workforce stability.   On the road to Mandate Land Getty Images   Another influential recommendation came from a group of more than 55 national organizations of healthcare professionals, supporting mandatory vaccination policies for healthcare workers. Support for organizations that choose to mandate is now coming from the American Health Care Association/National Center for Assisted Living, representing more than 14,000 nursing homes and other senior care facilities. Danielle Brown and Kimberly Marselas have details in McKnight’s Long-Term Care News. The senior care industry had set a national goal of vaccinating 75% of staff by July 1, but by July 11 the number stood at 58.4%, Marselas notes. A closer look by the CDC at 300 long-term care facilities reveals a yawning gap between the vaccination rates of physicians and advanced-care providers (75%) and the vaccination rates of nurses (57%) and aides (46%) in 300 facilities as of March 2021. Reality check: As McKnight’s Alicia Lasek notes, at that point in time long-term care residents and staff at that point represented one third of all COVID-19 deaths in the US. A growing number of healthcare organizations are making the leap from vaccine recommendation to requirement, including St. Louis-based Ascension, which employs more than 160,000 people at hospitals and senior care facilities in 19 states and the District of Columbia, Kimberly Bonvissuto reports in McKnight’s Senior Living. Three health systems in Idaho—including St. Luke’s Health System, the state’s largest private employer—are implementing vaccination mandates for their employees. Taking the same step, Bonvissuto adds, are LCS, a senior living provider based in Des Moines, and Episcopal Retirement Services, based in Cincinnati. The list will keep growing. Add the California-based Kaiser Permanente system with 216,000 employees and 23,000 physicians; Memorial Hermann Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine, both in Houston; and Norton Healthcare and Baptist Health in Louisville. The "biggest shoe to drop" in the long-term care industry is Genesis HealthCare, largest nursing home chain in the country with 357 facilities, according to McKnight’s James M. Berklan. Genesis employees have until August 23 to get their first dose. Joining the healthcare sector in mandate land are a number of major employers, including Disney and Walmart, along with Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Uber, Lyft, Tyson Foods and the Washington Post, along with Wall Street heavyweights Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs. Disney’s mandate applies to salaried and non-union hourly employees in the US as well as all new hires. Walmart’s requirement is for corporate employees but not store workers, though the latter now qualify for a $150 bonus (up from $75) if they roll up their sleeves. New York City will require proof of at least one dose of vaccination for patrons of restaurants, gyms, and indoor entertainment venues. Before that announcement, most Broadway theaters had agreed to require audiences to be fully vaccinated for performances through October. Cast and crew must be vaccinated too, but there will be no meet and greet autograph sessions or backstage tours. Some bars, restaurants and nightclubs in Chicago and Seattle are choosing to serve vaccinated patrons only. Mandate momentum is growing among government workers. First, we had a vaccination mandate from the VA system for its 115,000 healthcare workers, then a policy declaration by President Biden that all federal civilian workers who are not vaccinated must submit to weekly testing and other mitigation measures. Similar actions are taking place at the city, county and state levels. In Denver, a vaccination mandate issued Monday by Mayor Michael B. Hancock applies not only to 10,000 municipal workers but also to people working in congregate settings, including nursing homes, homeless shelters, corrections facilities, hospitals, schools and colleges. Healthcare workers in public and private facilities in New Jersey will have a choice between COVID-19 vaccination (by September 7) and once or twice a week testing, per an order by Governor Phil Murphy. A US Court of Appeals has upheld Indiana University’s vaccination mandate. "People who do not want to be vaccinated may go elsewhere," wrote Judge Frank Easterbrook. For the students challenging the requirement, "elsewhere" will now be the U.S. Supreme Court. Six hundred other colleges that have announced mandates will be watching closely.   Sponsored Content It’s time for senior living communities to rethink the role that dining services plays in caring for people with dementia across the care continuum. The tendency is to focus dementia care training and service needs on residents in the “memory care unit.” Dementia, however, exists wherever there are older adults. If it is missed, then a senior living community loses an opportunity to provide good care to vulnerable residents living with dementia. Senior living communities must “go upstream” and provide dementia-sensitive services at every level of care, including in the dining/hospitality realm. In this webinar, experts in the field will highlight the benefits of a more purpose-driven dining staff and will spotlight the differences between therapeutic hospitality and traditional hospitality.   Managing the messaging The Cape Cod study and other investigations demonstrate that the vaccinated, while well protected against severe COVID-19 outcomes, can still get infected and transmit the virus to others. Processing this news requires keeping in mind the bigger picture: As the overall level of vaccination coverage increases, "Vaccinated persons are likely to represent a larger proportion of COVID-19 cases," the CDC noted. Also a key part of the bigger picture: 99.99% of vaccinated individuals in the U.S. have not had a breakthrough case resulting in hospitalization or death. At the same time, Delta is now known to be highly transmissible and virulent, thus warranting an extra measure of caution, especially for people at highest risk for severe disease. In Axios, Caitlin Owens describes the balancing act that communicators must pull off: "Reassuring the majority of vaccinated Americans they don't need to freak out could backfire if it causes those who are at risk to let down their guard." To lend a helping hand, the Public Health Communications Collaborative has updated its messaging guidance in response to the CDC’s latest mask recommendations. Among the points to emphasize: While fully vaccinated people can experience breakthrough infection and transmit the virus to others, "These cases represent a very small amount of transmission occurring around the country." Vaccination remains the best way to prevent illness, curb transmission and end the pandemic. Someone out there is listening. Vaccination rates are up in nearly all states, notably Southern states that had lagged, including Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Arkansas. The Axios-Ipsos Coronavirus Index reports that hard opposition to vaccination is down to its lowest level, at 15%, and that firm parental opposition to children’s vaccination is 25%, down from 29% in mid-July.   The communications effort Getty Images In MM+M, Larry Dobrow connects with Drs. Italo Brown and Jamie Rutland, young Black physicians who host YouTube’s “Barbershop Medicine.” With recent guest Dr. Anthony Fauci, they explored vaccine hesitancy in Black and Brown communities. The hosts hope their show generates increased interest in medicine for young African Americans, stimulates health-and-wellness conversations at the dinner table and increases health-literacy levels throughout the community. To boost vaccinations among young people, the White House has enlisted an "eclectic army" of more than 50 influencers with huge followings on Twitch, YouTube and TikTok, The New York Times reports. In addition, state and local governments are turning to local influencers and paying them up to $1,000 a month to promote COVID-19 vaccines. In the U.K., creative agency Grey London has developed a campaign that sends a message to pub goers on their beer mats (a.k.a. coasters): "Get the vaccine when you can. Keep the fun flowing." Campaign reports that the beer mats are designed to help independent pubs ``that have lacked financial support during the pandemic and see the vaccination program as their key to their business survival." Researchers in the U.K., writing in the journal Virulence, warn that easing pandemic restrictions, as the country did two weeks ago, can open the door to new and dangerous variants, Nick Bostock reports in GP. "The laissez-faire approach that many governments are now taking towards COVID-19 management risks substantially increasing mortality and morbidity in the wider population," the researchers wrote. A bill sponsored by Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota would remove liability protection for social media channels that spread health-related misinformation. Lecia Bushak offers background and details in MM+M. The legislation calls on the Department of Health and Human Services to set guidelines on what constitutes misinformation. In southwest Michigan, two local health departments are teaming up with the United Way to train vaccine champions to educate the community on the importance of COVID-19 vaccination. Their efforts will include door-to-door outreach, conversations on social media, driving people to vaccination appointments and hosting vaccination clinics. Not everything clicks. A traveling van offered COVID-19 vaccinations for two days from 4 to 7 p.m. at the St. Charles County Fair in Wentzville, outside of St. Louis. No one showed up.   Back to work? For many employers, Delta is delaying the return to work. United Minds and its parent company, Weber Shandwick, are collaborating on a playbook for return-to-the-office communications strategies. PRWeek’s Betsy Kim, in a conversation with United Minds CEO Kate Bullinger, covers vaccination mandates, employee burnout and the importance of preserving flexibility and autonomy in a hybrid culture that is equitable for all. The U.K. is dealing with a "pingdemic" of folks receiving notices from a National Health Service app that they must isolate at home after coming in contact with a person who tested positive for coronavirus. In People Management, Caitlin Powell writes that businesses are worried the test-and-trace program will leave them short-staffed. In the first week of July, the app sent more than 500,000 "stay at home" alerts in England and Wales. The pingdemic has hit the ad industry, Maisie McCabe reports in Campaign, turning photo shoots into an often-frantic search for available talent. "Whereas once you only had to make one phone call to find a replacement, now it takes 30," said Steve Davies, chief executive of the Advertising Producers Association.   The vaccine dashboard Getty Images COVID-19 deaths in Africa have increased 80% over the past four weeks. The World Health Organization describes the disparate impact of the pandemic in poorer countries with lower vaccination rates (and limited access to vaccines) as a "global failure." The Biovac Institute of South Africa has struck a deal with Pfizer/BioNTech to produce and distribute COVID-19 vaccine at a rate of 100 million doses a year. The FDA is stepping up the pace in reviewing Pfizer/BioNTech’s application for full licensure of its COVID-19 vaccine, STAT reports. The process could be completed by Labor Day, the New York Times says. West Virginia will measure antibody levels in nursing home residents to assess whether immunity levels are waning and booster shots are needed, Caroline Szachnowski reports in McKnight’s Long-Term Care News. Booster COVID-19 shots are already in the works for older and more vulnerable segments of the population in Israel and Germany. Some in the U.S. are chasing boosters prematurely. The WHO wants boosters to be put on hold at least through September, as millions are still waiting for their first shot.   Parting shot As of early this week, 294 people associated with the Olympics had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Officials regard that as a success, considering that 42,000 people from outside Japan converged on Tokyo for the Games. At least six Team USA athletes could not compete because of COVID protocols. The resurgence of disease reminds us that there is no easy end to a pandemic. Appropriately, the Olympic Games end with a marathon and not a sprint.   …and some Olympic songs Rise, Katy Perry (Rio De Janeiro, 2016) Survival, Muse (London, 2012) You and Me, Liu Huan and Sara Brightman (Beijing, 2008) Oceania, Bjork (Athens, 2004) The Power of the Dream, Celine Dion (Atlanta, 1996) Barcelona, Freddie Mercury and Montserrat Caballe (Barcelona, 1992) One Moment in Time, Whitney Houston (Seoul, 1988) Bugler’s Dream and Olympic Theme, John Williams There’s lots going on, folks, so many thanks for listening. Stay tuned and we’ll be back next Wednesday with more for you in the Vaccine Project Newsletter. Be well, stay safe. Tame those twisties.   Subscribed as: edapaycation@gmail.com | Privacy Policy | Terms & Conditions To unsubscribe from the Coronavirus Briefing newsletter, click here © 2021 Haymarket Media, Inc. | 275 7th Ave, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10001
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Bryant
Jul 29, 2021
In FYI Links
https://www.linkedin.com/posts/stony-brook-university_earlier-today-staff-and-faculty-had-the-activity-6818642606449274880-lDCH Sent from my iPhone
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Bryant
Jul 21, 2021
In FYI Links
By Jeff Forster This week’s Vaccine Project Newsletter is 2,650 words and will take you eight minutes to read. The Olympic Games will formally open in Tokyo on Friday with much less pomp and much more circumstance than originally planned. If staging an Olympiad in the middle of a pandemic was an utter impossibility in 2020, staging one in the throes of a semi-subdued pandemic in 2021, at stadiums and venues devoid of spectators, is not proving to be much easier. Accompanying the medal counts will be another statistic: positive tests for the SARS-CoV-2 virus.Testing and tracing will be an Olympian effort in itself. For the non-Olympians, the summer is not turning out to be the disease-free joyride many had hoped for and anticipated. The tide of COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths in the U.S., driven by the momentum-gathering Delta variant (now accounting for an estimated 83% of US cases) is rising rather than ebbing. There were 10,000 new cases in one week in Los Angeles County, where an indoor mask mandate is back in place. The American Academy of Pediatrics on Monday recommended that all children over age 2, regardless of COVID-19 vaccination status, wear a mask in school. National Nurses United, the largest union of RNs, is asking the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to reinstate masking recommendations in public for all. Communities with subpar rates of COVID-19 vaccination are the equivalent of low-lying areas in a flood zone, while the fully vaccinated occupy a higher, safer ground. CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky says we are witnessing a “pandemic of the unvaccinated,” as 97% of recent COVID-19 hospitalizationsoccurred among the shotless. To be sure, we can point to notable successes. Nearly 60% of US adults are fully vaccinated, including 80% of seniors. The flip side of that coin: 40%, or some 100 million individuals, remain unvaccinated, a number of them resolutely or defiantly so. As Cliff Young, president of Ipsos U.S. Public Affairs puts it, some are nudge-able and others are unbudge-able. “From a public health standpoint,” Young said, “they’ve got to figure out how you nudge the nudge-able.” As the vaccination rollout moves from the ready and willing to the uncertain and resistant, communication strategies must become local and personal, Lecia Bushak reports in MM+M. “One at a time, one conversation at a time, is the way this is going to work,” said Lorna Thorpe, a population health expert at NYU Langone. As one Biden administration aide told Politico, “The first 180 million were much easier than the next 5 million.” In its latest weekly COVID-19 data update, the CDC explains why “location, location, location” matters so much in this pandemic. Grassroots efforts require a more finely tuned understanding of what drives skepticism among individuals and groups, Bushak reports, whether in regard to political or religious beliefs, concerns about safety or lack of information and access to vaccines. “What we’ve had to do as a public health industry is better understand what builds trust and what is leading to potential distrust, and then create programs, campaigns and spokespeople to address the nuances. It’s a very powerful emotion and a tall charge,” explained Real Chemistry president Michele Schimmel. One festering source of hesitancy, according to U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, is an abundance of misinformation, as social media platforms serve as bully pulpits for the wrong kind of bull. In his first official advisory of this administration, Dr. Murthy described healthcare misinformation as “an urgent threat to public health” that is causing confusion, sowing mistrust and undermining the effort to end the pandemic. Murthy, who also served as Surgeon General in the Obama years, noted that more than two-thirds of unvaccinated adults have heard at least one COVID-19 vaccine myth and either believed it or were not sure of its veracity. False news stories, he added, are 70% more likely to be shared on social media than true ones. Even brief exposure to misinformation makes people less likely to want a COVID-19 vaccine. Murthy called for an “all-of-society” response to confronting and curbing health misinformation, from the tech and social media companies that make it abundantly available to the individuals who copiously share. The Surgeon General’s full report is available here. In MM+M, Bushak reports that YouTube is now making an effort to prioritize health information from medical schools, departments of public health and other credible sources. The platform is also developing partnerships with academic centers such as Cleveland Clinic and Mass General Brigham and drawing upon National Academy of Medicine guidelines for countering misinformation. Meanwhile, Twitter temporarily suspended the account of Georgia Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene for sharing COVID-19 vaccine misinformation. In moving from mass appeal to one-on-one dialogue, the vaccination campaign is drawing on techniques that have worked politically. Phone callers, for example, are turning to behavioral psychology approaches that have been successful in getting out the vote or encouraging people to complete census forms, notes John Jameson, founder of the political persuasion firm Winning Connections. Jameson, who has worked with the nonprofit Healthier Colorado on COVID-19 vaccination efforts, explains in Medpage Today: “Trained callers might ask: ‘When you go to get your vaccine, will you drive, walk or take a bus?’ This might be followed by, ‘Will you go alone or with a family member or friend?’ Getting individuals to visualize how they will carry out a future activity makes them more likely to do it.” Similarly, Adrian Montgomery, CEO of Enthusiast Gaming, says his company is working with the Ad Council to develop vaccination messaging for Gen Z. In 2020, the Biden presidential campaign hired Montgomery’s company to mobilize the vote among young people. The key to reaching people, both then and now, is not to attempt direct persuasion but rather encourage people to learn more about vaccines and give them an opportunity to opt in, Montgomery stresses. This approach is right in the Ad Council’s “It’s Up to You” wheelhouse, not so much leading a horse to water as offering a healthy stream of helpful information.
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Bryant
Jul 07, 2021
In FYI Links
https://link.mail.mcknights.com/a/1326/preview/19960/560733/4d747970b1c0fe4ff2e73bca6def39e54d758b35?message_id=ImY3NTNjOWEwLWMxOGMtMDEzOS1iZjhmLTQyMDEwYTgwMDA2MEBtYWlsLm1ja25pZ2h0cy5jb20i
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Bryant
Jun 23, 2021
In FYI Links
If you are having trouble viewing this email, click here. VACCINE PROJECT NEWSLETTERGetty ImagesBy Jeff Forster Today’s Haymarket Media Vaccine Project Newsletter is 2,610 words and will take you 9 minutes to read. What started as a tidal wave of COVID-19 vaccination in the first quarter of this year—remember those long lines of cars queued up at the mega-sites?—began to ebb as March turned to April and April turned to May. To re-energize the effort, President Biden on May 4 announced the goal of getting one shot into the arms of 70% of American adults by July 4. It has proved to be a laudable but elusive goal. Yesterday the White House admitted that we will fall short of the 70% threshold by the time we fire up the holiday BBQs. Yes, we have managed to vaccinate 70% of adults over age 30 (and 65.5% of all adults), but have yet to persuade the younger set to roll up their sleeves en masse. As of May 22 just 38% of adults ages 18 to 29 have had at least one shot, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports, versus 57% of all adults and 80% of seniors 65 and older. At current rates of vaccination, coverage by the end of August would reach 78% for all adults but with wide swings: a whopping 95% for seniors, 86% for adults ages 50 to 64, 71% for the 30- and 40-somethings, but just 58% for those 18 to 29. The reasons why people don’t get vaccinated are the ones you likely have heard: concerns about side effects, general distrust of COVID-19 vaccines, a desire to “wait and see” more evidence of safety and effectiveness, a feeling that others are more in need of a vaccine, or a belief that the vaccine itself is not needed at all. To improve vaccination rates in younger adults, the CDC suggests turning to trusted sources, such as health authorities and primary care providers, “to explain the community and individual value of vaccination and to address concerns about vaccine safety.” If younger adults don’t feel particularly vulnerable to serious illness themselves, it helps to emphasize that vaccines are important in preventing the spread of COVID-19 to family and friends and resuming social activities. Also suggested: offering vaccinations at work and at strategically located mobile and walk-in clinics with flexible hours. Let’s take some measure of pride in the fact that we have fully vaccinated 150 million Americans since mid-December, no small feat, and that what President Biden describes as a “summer of joy” is still within reach of a pandemic-weary country.Sponsored ContentThis year you “got lost in the game” again, dropping millions of dollars promoting your brand to consumers. You’re not sure you have the right audience, whether you chose the right channels or if it made an impact. You’re not that innocent, and know you’ll need better data assets to plan your campaign, drive campaign precision and get insights for optimization and to deliver a strong ROI. Will vaccine perks and privileges be enough?Quite apart from the million-dollar lotteries and sweepstakes, with their long shots of winning big bucks or college scholarships, any number of perks and benefits are within easy reach of the COVID-19 vaccinated. On Father’s Day, the Foo Fighters played to a fully vaccinated crowd at Madison Square Garden, the first concert at the World’s Most Famous Arena since March 2020. Anti-vax protestors waved signs outside. The first cruise ship available to North Americans since March 2020 set sail from St. Maarten earlier this month with 95% of passengers and 100% of crew fully vaccinated. Carnival Cruise Line will depart with a load of fully vaccinated passengers on its first ship out of Galveston, Texas in July. Many—but not all—cruise lines are requiring COVID-19 vaccination as a condition of stepping on board. Such requirements are currently a matter of contention in the courts, but when all is sorted out, the vaccinated are likely to enjoy smoother sailing. In its guidance covering all types of travel, at home and abroad, the CDC draws a bright line between the vaccinated and unvaccinated when it comes to testing and quarantining as well as the trifecta of masking, distancing, and washing hands. The CDC also has an infographic on “Choosing Safer Activities,” showing the faces of happy, maskless and vaccinated people along one side of a list of activities and the faces of less happy, mostly masked and unvaccinated people along the other side. The CDC considers it “least safe” for the unvaccinated to go to an indoor movie theater, attend a full-capacity worship service, eat at an indoor restaurant or bar or participate in an indoor, high-intensity exercise class. In all such situations, the agency recommends the mask/distance/wash trifecta for the unvaccinated only. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has updated its guidelines for employers—and its rules for healthcare settings—that allow different sets of standards for the vaccinated and unvaccinated in the interests of mitigating the risk of COVID-19 transmission in the workplace. California celebrated the full-blown re-opening of its economy on June 15, lifting restrictions here and there and almost everywhere while not abandoning all caution. For example, people who go to indoor concerts, sports events or other large gatherings of more than 5,000 people will have to provide proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test. At outdoor events with more than 10,000 people, folks are “strongly encouraged” to do the same. California is offering 50,000 free passes to Six Flags amusement parks to the vaccinated. New York also marked its re-opening on June 15. Fairs and festivals may eliminate six feet of social distancing and thus increase capacity “if all attendees within the event space—or a separate designated area in the event space—present proof of full vaccination status.” Sponsored ContentPRWeek and NetBase Quid recently published the results of an exclusive survey that gauges where comms pros currently stand on their media-intelligence capabilities. During this webcast, we will bring that report to life by sharing data and offering expert insights and counsel on issues. The Vax and the Vax-NotGetty ImagesThe National Football League demonstrated just how far the distinctions can go. Unvaccinated players must undergo daily testing for COVID-19; the fully vaccinated are exempt. The vaccinated have unrestricted use of the team cafeteria, weight room, steam room and sauna; the unvaccinated do not. Vaccinated players can eat with vaccinated family members and friends while traveling; the unvaccinated must stay in the team hotel for meals, cannot dine in restaurants and are not allowed to interact with non-team members while traveling. All of these guidelines are part of a joint agreement between the NFL and the players’ union for the 2021 season. For the vast majority who do not play professional football, some form of preferential treatment awaits those of us who have had our COVID-19 shots. Did we mention the most pertinent perk of all: Gaining a healthy measure of protection against a disease that can be debilitating or fatal? These developments come at a time when everything seems to be dropping. Nationally, COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths are down precipitously compared to where we were a year ago. At the same time, COVID-19 vaccination rates are falling off after a strong push in Q1 of 2021. One thing that should not drop, public health officials caution, is our guard, especially in parts of the country where vaccination rates are low and segments of the population remain vulnerable to the virus. Hot spots keep cropping up on the COVID-19 weather map—in southern Missouri, for example, where a surge in cases and hospitalizations occurred in counties with vaccination rates below 30%, counties that are home to tourist attractions such as Branson and Lake of the Ozarks. The virus itself keeps shape-shifting, the latest rogue being the highly transmissible Delta variant, first identified in India and now rampant in the U.K. and delaying a return to normal activities. Delta is quickly gaining a foothold in the U.S., responsible for about 20% of infections, and on a pathway to becoming globally dominant, according to the World Health Organization. The good news is that the vaccinated are generally well protected against this and other variants. The bad news is that the unvaccinated, who number in the tens of millions and represent half of the U.S. population, are not. We have essentially answered the question of, if we build a vaccination mega-site, will they come? The answer was yes, about half of them. The vaccination campaign is now rolling out in smaller community-based settings: doctors’ offices, pharmacies, neighborhood health centers and pop-up clinics. Door-to-door canvassing of the homebound is an option, as Diane Eastabrook reports in McKnight’s Home Care Daily. The Mayors Challenge to Increase COVID-19 Vaccinations, looking to employ any and all strategies, has 114 participating cities. Now that everyone 12 and older is vaccine-eligible, children and adolescents remain key pieces of the puzzle. A Harris Poll finds that 54% of parents intend to have their 12- to 17-year-olds fully vaccinated, while 9% have already done so. Nearly two-thirds (62%) plan to have their children under 12 vaccinated when that becomes an option. Some parents (11%-12%) want their kids to have just one instead of two doses of vaccine, which is not a recipe for optimal protection against emerging variants. One in four parents do not intend to have their children vaccinated as they await more data on safety (51%) and effectiveness (37%). Nearly two thirds of parents (64%) support required vaccination of eligible children in grades K-12 and 72% support mandatory vaccination of teachers and school staff. Most employers are still choosing to encourage rather than mandate vaccination, with notable exceptions among hospitals, health systems, senior care networks and universities. IntegraCare, based in Pittsburgh with 13 senior living facilities in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, has achieved a 100% vaccination rate among staff, Kimberly Bonvissuto reports in McKnight’s Senior Living. Enlivant, a Chicago-based company with 216 senior communities in 26 states, has vaccinated 90% of staff and residents and is working toward 100% in a campaign called “Together We Can Do It.” Other senior living centers have achieved staff vaccination rates of 97% and 98% with mandates. Despite these signature successes, the long-term care industry concedes that it will not reach its national goal of vaccinating 75% of staff by June 30. Danielle Brown has details in McKnight’s Long-Term Care News. Anyone working in a nursing home or personal care facility in England will need to be vaccinated against COVID-19, Nick Bostock reports in GP. The policy, which requires approval by Parliament, applies to physicians paying visits to residents as well as hairdressers, tradespeople and others who provide services on site. Some employers are concerned that the mandate could hamper recruitment and retention in a sector that is already experiencing a staff shortage. Jessica Brown has details in People Management. Sponsored ContentIf you are a rehabilitation therapist (PT, OT, SLP), respiratory therapist, nurse, or healthcare executive, you don’t want to miss this opportunity to learn more about how the new OmniFlowTM Breathing Therapy Biofeedback System can help you deliver engaging breathing exercises to your patients and improve their quality of life. The challenges The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is meeting today to examine data on reported cases of heart inflammation in teen and young adult recipients of COVID-19 vaccine. The item was on the agenda for a meeting last Friday but the session was postponed by the newly designated Juneteenth holiday. While vaccination is the front end of the COVID-19 solution, the back end is providing successful treatment for those who get sick. Good news: Regeneron’s monoclonal antibody cocktail of casirivimab and imdevimab reduced the risk of death by 20% in hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were not able to mount an immune response. The Food and Drug Administration has issued an emergency use authorization for another monoclonal antibody, GlaxoSmithKline’s sotrovimab, for treating adults and children (12 and up) with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 that is at risk for progressing to severe disease. To explore the evolving field of monoclonal therapy for COVID-19, MPR’s Batya Swift Yasgur interviews Jason Gallagher, a clinical professor at Temple University and co-author of the Infectious Diseases Society of America treatment guidelines for COVID-19. Meanwhile, Merck has agreed to sell 1.7 million courses of the antiviral molnupiravir to the U.S. government for $1.2 billion as soon as the drug, now in Phase 3 trials for treatment of COVID-19, receives an EUA from the FDA (the ticket to ride). The Biden administration is placing an additional $3.2 billion bet on the development of “easily administered” oral antivirals (i.e., pills) for COVID-19. The money for the Antiviral Program for Pandemics is coming from the American Rescue Plan. There is also a front end and back end of COVID-19 treatment. The front end is focused on keeping people out of the hospital, off respirators and alive, while the back end is all about seeking answers for the lingering, long-term consequences of the disease. The CDC has issued clinical guidance for these post-COVID conditions, Alicia Lasek reports in McKnight’s Long-Term Care News, noting that one in four COVID-19 survivors has at least one persistent post-acute symptom. Disputes over wearing masks have led to at least eight fatalities in the U.S., the most recent the shooting of a supermarket cashier by a 30-year-old customer near Atlanta. As we emerge from the COVID-19 tunnel into a brighter day, consumers will demand that businesses actively demonstrate community spirit, Amy Cashman writes in Management Today. Cashman, CEO of the UK Insights division at Kantar, says, “The pandemic has shifted the emphasis around purpose, refocusing attention on the impact businesses have at a human level over and above things like corporate investment in good causes or activity to mitigate environmental damage.” Kantar’s Global Barometer, she noted, showed that “three out of four people thought the number one thing companies should be prioritizing was employees’ health.” Sponsored ContentGet to know each of the MM+M Places To Be by learning about their company culture, work/life balance, D&I initiatives and more. The vaccine dashboardGetty Images CureVac, a German company, reported disappointing results for its first-generation COVID-19 vaccine in a Phase 2b/3 trial: 47% efficacy against disease of any severity. Researchers identified at least 13 variants of SARS-CoV-2 within the study population in Latin America and Europe; the original virus was virtually nowhere to be found. CureVac is continuing the trial and also partnering with GSK on a second-generation vaccine with more robust activity against variants. Two doses of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine did not affect sperm counts in a small group of healthy male volunteers (n = 45) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. The CDC says that COVID-19 vaccines do not impair male or female fertility, an oft-cited concern of the vaccine hesitant. The U.S. is buying another 200 million doses of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, looking ahead to vaccination of younger children and perhaps the need for booster shots. That brings Moderna’s total U.S. commitment to 500 million doses, 217 million of which have been delivered. In India, with 30 million COVID-19 cases and close to 400,000 deaths, everyone will be eligible for a free vaccine paid for by the government, AP reports, although patients who get their vaccine through a private hospital will still have to pay. Less than 5% of the population is fully vaccinated. The American College of Physicians is calling for greater equity in distributing vaccines globally, Britt Gambino reports in Pulmonology Advisor. The COVAX effort to vaccinate the world needs 2 billion doses in 2021 and is struggling to reach that goal. In the poorest countries, only 1% have had at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, and just 10% of the world’s population is fully vaccinated. Parting shotThe Ad Council and CDC, with support from the Rockefeller Foundation, have launched a series of PSAs encouraging people to continue masking up until they are vaccinated. The 30-second spots, titled “Book Club,” “Concert” and “Swim,” are the work of creative agencies Colle McVoy and SKDK. The ongoing Mask Up America campaign, launched a year ago, has generated more than a billion impressions across $17.8 million in donated, earned and shared media. ...and some songs for the first days of summer Summertime, Ella Fitzgerald Under the Boardwalk, The Drifters The Boys of Summer, Don Henley Endless Summer Nights, Richard Marx Soak Up the Sun, Sheryl Crow Vacation, The Go-Gos Summer, from Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, Mari Samuelsen, soloist Thanks for joining us and welcome to Summer! May it truly be a season of joy. See you here next Wednesday. Be well. Subscribed as: edapaycation@gmail.com | Privacy Policy | Terms & Conditions To unsubscribe from the Coronavirus Briefing newsletter, click here © 2021 Haymarket Media, Inc. | 275 7th Ave, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10001
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Bryant
May 24, 2021
In Student and Alumni Events
May 2021 | TOP STORIES FEATURED ON STONY BROOK MATTERS: • Stars of Stony Brook Gala Raises Nearly $2 Million for Student Scholarships • Stony Brook Ranked No. 39 Nationwide in QS Survey • SBU Researchers Studying Mercury Levels Under Ice • Taking Stock of How Weather Affects Investing • SBU Scientists Take a Multi-Faceted Approach to Restoring Shinnecock Bay • Cernadas-Martín ’12, ’19, is a Champion for Marine and Human Diversity • Knapp Chair, Esther S. Takeuchi, Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences • Grad Students Present Research at Annual 3MT Competition • Fifteen Journalism Students Win Awards for Excellent Reporting • Join Us for the Scholarship Golf Classic - No Matter Your Location, Skill Level, or Calendar! • Nominate a Stony Brook Alum for the 40 Under Forty Recognition Program • Join the Career Center for a Virtual Job Fair and Recent Grad Retreat this June • Ashley Langford Named SBU Women's Basketball Head Coach • Register Now for the Seawolves United Virtual 5K When you invest in students at Stony Brook, you aid in social mobility through the transformative power of a Stony Brook education. Make your gift today! Give Today | Privacy Policy | Email Preferences | Unsubscribe Stony Brook Alumni Association, Stony Brook University, E-1315 Frank Melville Jr. Memorial Library, Stony Brook, NY, 11794-3354 Stony Brook Foundation, Stony Brook University, 230 Administration, Stony Brook, NY 11794-1188
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Bryant
May 18, 2021
In FYI Links
My Active Senior is a search platform designed for the senior demographic. You can find housing, homecare, virtual exercise classes, safety devices and so much more! Visit MyActiveSenior.com for your senior care needs. #myactivesenior #seniorcare #elderlycare #homecare
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Bryant
May 13, 2021
In Student and Alumni Events
https://news.stonybrook.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/ric-mcclendon.jpg
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Bryant
Apr 24, 2021
In FYI Links
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/23/health/elderly-medical-equipment.html?smid=url-share
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Bryant
Apr 22, 2021
In FYI Links
From U.S. News & World Report: https://health.usnews.com/health-care/for-better/articles/vaccine-hesitancy-in-seniors
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Bryant
Apr 21, 2021
In Student and Alumni Events
The Black and Latino Alumni Network is a community with a common goal: to support and embolden Stony Brook’s diverse student body. Please make a gift today 4-21-22, to ensure that students who have demonstrated a commitment to civic engagement and social responsibility are given the tools needed to thrive. WATCH YOUR VIDEO!
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Bryant
Apr 20, 2021
In FYI Links
SBU Alum Vincent DeSantis http://pvainsurancegroup.com/agent/vincent-desantis/a-quarter-of-those-age-65-say/
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Bryant
Apr 15, 2021
In FYI Links
PENELOPE EDWARDS CONRAD, MD April 15, 2021 Living In Most Disadvantaged Neighborhoods May Correlate With increased Degeneration In Alzheimer’s Disease “Signature” Regions Of The Brain, Cognitive Decline, Scan Study Indicates Healio (4/14, Ernst) reports, “Living in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods correlated with increased degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease ‘signature’ regions of the brain and cognitive decline,” investigators concluded in a study that “obtained longitudinal MRI and cognitive testing data from 601 cognitively unimpaired individuals in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention study and the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center clinical cohort.” The findings of the “longitudinal” study were published online in Neurology.
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Bryant
Apr 15, 2021
In Next Generation Leader
OK, I don't know if the title of this email threw you off or not, but you've got to watch this video presentation. It involves the bullies in our lives, how they hold us back and keep us from living our best life. You can watch the presentation here, I guarantee that it will change your life. Please take care and have an amazing day. Sincerely, Dr Boyce Watkins
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Bryant
Apr 15, 2021
In Student and Alumni Events
magazine.stonybrook.edu
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Bryant
Apr 10, 2021
In FYI Links
https://events.sibley.org/events/3159 Zoom Saturday April 17 - 2:30-6:30pm
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Bryant
Apr 06, 2021
In Student and Alumni Events
I hope this finds you and your loved ones safe and well. As we approach the end of the semester, I would like to recognize the accomplishments of our students, faculty and staff who have persevered and thrived during one of the most challenging times many of us have ever faced. First, you likely have seen several changes to our administration over the course of the year, and I’m pleased to welcome Paul Goldbart, Executive Vice President and Provost, who officially joined SBU in March. As a visionary leader, Paul has demonstrated success in faculty development, curricular innovation, strategic planning, fundraising, public engagement, and diversity, equity and inclusion. While we are still navigating challenges posed by the pandemic, the College and University is leading the way in terms of research, science, exploration and social justice. Here are just a few of our accomplishments: SBU celebrated its 100,000th vaccination given at the University’s R&D Park Point of Distribution (POD) center Last fall, we mentioned the numerous research studies launched in response to COVID-19; many of these studies received federal funding totaling nearly $4 million. We held nearly 20 faculty talks for our community, engaging more than 6,000 alumni worldwide on topics ranging from the history of pandemics, the economic impact of COVID-19 as well its impact on the Autism community, and the 2020 election. It was a great way to stay connected with so many of you, and we would love to hear suggestions for future topics Our numerous unsung heroes across the College, from building managers, support technicians and administrative assistants have been on campus since day one of the pandemic, and our curriculum team, faculty, and staff spent countless hours building and reviewing courses as we prepared for online and hybrid instruction In addition, we recently had the opportunity to offer vaccinations to essential in person faculty and staff in the College. It was an “all hands on deck” experience, from identifying eligibility, to personally calling recipients to assist with the scheduling of appointments. I was humbled to hear first hand the excitement and appreciation of our colleagues and graduate students who were able to receive vaccination appointments. Student news: Learn more about Omar Badessi, a PhD student and instructor in the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature, whose passion for teaching helped students stay involved and engaged throughout the pandemic. My Dean’s Student Advisory Councilrecently began takeovers of the College’s Instagram and Twitter accounts to connect and engage with existing and prospective Seawolves on everything from programs of study, activities, and hidden gems on campus! Follow along to see “a day in the life” of several CAS Seawolves! Several of our students from a variety of disciplines recently launched podcasts in line with their areas of expertise: Department of English PhD alum Adam Katz and PhD candidate Andrew Rimby started the Ivory Tower Boiler Room, a platform for discussing how the fairy tale of academic life is at odds with reality Students from the Departments of Biochemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Economics, and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies launched Queer Diagnosis: The LGBTQ+ Health Podcast. Through interviews of LGBTQ+ patients, medical students, and healthcare providers, the students stress the importance of providing high-quality, culturally sensitive care while promoting equality and respect for all. Developed by Wali Pirzada, a senior biochemistry major, and Sayeed Khan, a junior majoring in Biology and minoring in History, Chai With the Pre Med Guys features medical students and health professionals discussing their journey on the path to medicine. Faculty news: Department of Art professor Stephanie Dinkins is part of a team who received a $4.8M grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support a digital futures collaborative network. This comes on the heels of her recent naming as the inaugural Yayoi Kusama Endowed Professor of Art. Read more about Stephanie and her impressive accomplishments. We’re so excited for the forthcoming Discovery Prize competition on April 28! Two of the four finalists are rising CAS faculty: Eszter Boros, Department of Chemistry, and Greg Henkes, Department of Geosciences. Department of English professor and chair Andrew Newman received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to co-direct a Summer Seminar for School Teachers on the topic of the history of literature instruction in the United States Department of Africana Studies associate professor Zebulon Miletsky received the 2020 Innovations in Pedagogy Award teaching fellowship from The HistoryMakers, non-profit educational institution that maintains the nation's largest African American Video oral history archive Last year, we introduced our Navigational Guide to 2030 as part of our shared vision, which remains relevant and aligned with societal needs that have arisen during the COVID pandemic. Our three constellations of intellectual strength and principles for decision making will continue to provide guidance post-pandemic and beyond as we strive to achieve even greater impact in our research, mentorship and curricular innovations. While the pandemic, combined with social and political challenges of the past year have impacted how we work, they have not stifled our efforts to keep moving forward. You can view our current progress here. We appreciate your support! Your generosity has a profound impact on the lives of our students. Thank you for your continued support. We hope you will join us for Giving Day on Wednesday, April 21, 2021! Last fall, your generosity helped us make a difference in the lives of many students through scholarships and important programs and initiatives. We are participating this spring to raise funds for the CAS Dean’s Fund for Excellence, meant to help us transform the lives of current and future students. This important fund provides resources to respond to the greater needs of the College and allows me to provide critical assistance to our students, faculty, staff and programs. Your support can help provide enriching experiential learning and research opportunities, as well as financial assistance for our rising CAS students who especially need help during these challenging times. I’m hopeful that each passing day brings continued advances leading to an end of the pandemic and a return to a sense of normalcy where we can meet, hug and kiss our loved ones, and feel more safe in our day to day lives. I look forward to the time when we can once again gather on our beautiful campus. Until then, I hope to virtually see you soon. Be safe and well. With gratitude, Nicole S. Sampson Give Today | Privacy Policy | Email Preferences | Unsubscribe Stony Brook Alumni Association, Stony Brook University, E-1315 Frank Melville Jr. Memorial Library, Stony Brook, NY, 11794-3354 Stony Brook Foundation, Stony Brook University, 230 Administration, Stony Brook, NY 11794-1188
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